Rear Left

Stinger Sessions

Making moves on Sydney town. Wednesday is the first iteration of a monthly screening/performance/discussion/workshop series exploring the role of arts and media in social movements. Being very new to town it may take us a few months to build an audience, but we have no shortage of plans for future events and have resolved not to be daunted by what may be small numbers in the first few sessions.

Stinger Session 01 features Welcome to Metal Kingdom (previously mentioned in these pages) and looks at the often maligned heavy metal music community as a site for meaningful discourse around issues of culture and power.

Stinger Session 01

Welcome to Metal Kingdom

(+ shorts)

Wednesday, August 12, 7-9PM

Serial Space

33 Wellington St, Chippendale, Sydney

$5 – no one denied entry for lack of funds

Follow this project’s progress at www.stingersessions.com. Facebook, twitter, etc will be live soon.

Unmigration

Posted in Media & Movements by rearleft on June 2, 2009

Home. Away.

Engaging with Australia because I can’t re-engage with something I never really put any effort into knowing before, just as there can be no re-conciliation in this land where there never was a treaty.

These pages will now enter a new phase. One eye zoomed out on the intergalactic, one in tight searching Oz for signs of life.

Blip one:

wii-214x300

Pemulwuy Dream Team is a video game for the Wii console, crafted by Zanny Begg and Keg De Souza (You Are Here) and Andy Nicholson. The work builds on the crew’s residency at the Redfern Community Center. The game, accompanied by embroidered boxing capes representing some of its fighters is currently installed as part of There Goes the Neighbourhood (also currated by Keg and Zanny), an exhibition and series of events that address gentrification, both in Sydney and elsewhere.

Players box as either representatives of indigenous resistance from the present (eg local youth, 18th century freedom fighters) or personifications of the enemies of native people (eg a speed dealer, gentrification). The title refers to Pemulwuy, an indigenous man who lived in the area that was to become Sydney in the latter half of the 18th century. After many successful campaigns against the colonists, Pemulwuy was shot by a settler in 1802. They mailed his head back to England in a jar.

And it don’t stop ’til we get the po-po off The Block