Rear Left

White Cock Party

Posted in Media & Movements by rearleft on January 13, 2009

More curriculum-related research gems:

The Lowndes County Freedom Organization Logo, 1966

The first use of the Black Panther Party logo was not by the Oakland-based Black Panther Party who made it such an icon. It was used as a logo of a political formation called the Lowndes County Freedom Organization. The LCFO was organized by a group of SNCC radicals, including Stokely Carmichael, Huey P. Newton, and Bobby Seale.

Stokely Carmichael in 1966:

In Lowndes County, we developed something called the Lowndes County Freedom Organization. It is a political party. The Alabama law says that if you have a Party you must have an emblem. We chose for the emblem a black panther, a beautiful black animal which symbolizes the strength and dignity of black people, an animal that never strikes back until he’s back so far into the wall, he’s got nothing to do but spring out. Yeah. And when he springs he does not stop.

Now there is a Party in Alabama called the Alabama Democratic Party. It is all white. It has as its emblem a white rooster and the words “white supremacy” “For the Right”. Now the gentlemen of the Press, because they’re advertisers, and because most of them are white, and because they’re produced by that white institution, never called the Lowndes Country Freedom Organization by its name, but rather they call it the Black Panther Party. Our question is, Why don’t they call the Alabama Democratic Party the “White Cock Party”? (It’s fair to us…..) It is clear to me that that just points out America’s problem with sex and color, not our problem, not our problem. And it is now white America that is going to deal with sex and color.”

Alabama Democratic Party Logo until 1966

Alabama Democratic Party Logo until 1966

…and while we’re on the subject of whiteness, I can’t help myself:


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One Response

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  1. omalone1 said, on August 5, 2013 at 6:18 PM

    G wiz, amazing how logos travel and influence


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